#MoveForEquality

Breaking a rule
in chess to change
behavior in life.

Breaking a rule
in chess to change
behavior in life.

With the support of:

Untitled-1

#MoveForEquality

#MoveForEquality

#MoveForEquality

#MoveForEquality

#MoveForEquality

We have come a long way in the building of a more equal world. But racial discrimination is still a problem that we feel in our everyday lives. Talent is universal, but opportunity - nowadays - is not.

To inspire a worldwide discussion about equality, today on March 21 – the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination – two of the greatest chess players of all time broke the rules of the game they love.

Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen and GM Anish Giri teamed up to make a move towards equality.

The rules in chess are black and white: White always makes the first move. But not today.

We have come a long way in the building of a more equal world. But racial discrimination is still a problem that we feel in our everyday lives. Talent is universal, but opportunity - nowadays - is not.

To inspire a worldwide discussion about equality, today on March 21 – the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination – two of the greatest chess players of all time broke the rules of the game they love.

Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen and GM Anish Giri teamed up to make a move towards equality. The rules in chess are black and white: White always makes the first move. But not today.

The rules in chess are black and white: White always makes the first move. But not today.

We have come a long way in the building of a more equal world. But racial discrimination is still a problem that we feel in our everyday lives. Talent is universal, but opportunity - nowadays - is not.

To inspire a worldwide discussion about equality, today on March 21 – the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination – two of the greatest chess players of all time broke the rules of the game they love.

Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen and GM Anish Giri teamed up to make a move towards equality.

The rules in chess are black and white: White always makes the first move. But not today.

The Move

The Move

The Move

For one brief hour, Magnus and Anish put their rivalry aside to play a symbolic game that could truly make a difference. Watch the video below to see the symbolic move they made today. The game itself had no single winner. Because this should be a victory for anyone who dreams about a more equal world.

For one brief hour, Magnus and Anish put their rivalry aside to play a symbolic game that could truly make a difference.

Watch the video below to see the symbolic move they made today. The game itself had no single winner. Because this should be a victory for anyone who dreams about a more equal world.

For one brief hour, Magnus and Anish put their rivalry aside to play a symbolic game that could truly make a difference.

Watch the video below to see the symbolic move they made today. The game itself had no single winner. Because this should be a victory for anyone who dreams about a more equal world.

Anish

Who is
GM Anish Giri?

Who is GM Anish Giri?

Who is GM Anish Giri?

Who is GM
Anish Giri?

Who is GM
Anish Giri?

Anish is not only a chess prodigy and #4 in the FIDE ranking, but also a child of globalization. He was born in Russia, has a Nepali father, has lived in Japan and, right now, is a naturalized Dutch citizen. He credits his diverse background for instilling in him a unique mindset, and really believes diversity and equality are key to building a more fair and evolved world.

Find out more about Anish.

Anish is not only a chess prodigy and #4 in the FIDE ranking, but also a child of globalization. He was born in Russia, has a Nepali father, has lived in Japan and, right now, is a naturalized Dutch citizen. He credits his diverse background for instilling in him a unique mindset, and really believes diversity and equality are key to building a more fair and evolved world.

Find out more about Anish.

Anish is not only a chess prodigy and #4 in the FIDE ranking, but also a child of globalization. He was born in Russia, has a Nepali father, has lived in Japan and, right now, is a naturalized Dutch citizen. He credits his diverse background for instilling in him a unique mindset, and really believes diversity and equality are key to building a more fair and evolved world.

Find out more about Anish.
Magnus

Who is
GM Magnus Carlsen?

Who is GM Magnus Carlsen?

Who is GM Magnus Carlsen?

Who is GM
Magnus Carlsen?

Who is GM
Magnus Carlsen?

As four-times World Champion, you could say that Magnus has reached all the glory a grand chess master can achieve. But he would disagree. As the founder of digital chess company Play Magnus, and the Honorary Chairman of America’s Foundation for Chess, Magnus tries to use chess for good, bringing the sport of chess and critical thinking skills to children around the world.

Find out more about Magnus.

As four-times World Champion, you could say that Magnus has reached all the glory a grand chess master can achieve. But he would disagree. As the founder of digital chess company Play Magnus, and the Honorary Chairman of America’s Foundation for Chess, Magnus tries to use chess for good, bringing the sport of chess and critical thinking skills to children around the world.

Find out more about Magnus.

As four-times World Champion, you could say that Magnus has reached all the glory a grand chess master can achieve. But he would disagree. As the founder of digital chess company Play Magnus, and the Honorary Chairman of America’s Foundation for Chess, Magnus tries to use chess for good, bringing the sport of chess and critical thinking skills to children around the world.

Find out more about Magnus.

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International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

International Day for
the Elimination of
Racial Discrimination

International Day for
the Elimination of
Racial Discrimination

On March 21, 1960, South African police killed 69 people at a peaceful parade against apartheid. On March 21, 1966, the Day for The Elimination of Racial Discrimination was officially created.

This day is an opportunity for people around the world to renew their commitment to making our world a place of justice and dignity, where all races are treated equally. 

Find out more about the date.

On March 21, 1960, South African police killed 69 people at a peaceful parade against apartheid. On March 21, 1966, the Day for The Elimination of Racial Discrimination was officially created. This day is an opportunity for people around the world to renew their commitment to making our world a place of justice and dignity, where all races are treated equally.

Find out more about the date.

On March 21, 1960, South African police killed 69 people at a peaceful parade against apartheid. On March 21, 1966, the Day for The Elimination of Racial Discrimination was officially created.

This day is an opportunity for people around the world to renew their commitment to making our world a place of justice and dignity, where all races are treated equally.

Find out more about the date.

Chess Background History

Chess Background History

Chess Background History

The chess rule that states white should move first was established as a standard convention in the late 1800s. All World Championship games since 1886 (and even important matches earlier) have adopted the rule officially.

From then on, there has been much debate amongst chess players about whether moving first gives white a significant advantage. The rule was originally developed to make annotation easier, and has never been considered in the context of prejudice.

Nearly 100 years later, this campaign is merely a symbolic gesture to highlight what happens when you step away from the board, where a fair world is not a reality for many, and the dream of having perfect equality between races and people is still far from coming true.

The chess rule that states white should move first was established as a standard convention in the late 1800s. All World Championship games since 1886 (and even important matches earlier) have adopted the rule officially.

From then on, there has been much debate amongst chess players about whether moving first gives white a significant advantage. The rule was originally developed to make annotation easier, and has never been considered in the context of prejudice.

Nearly 100 years later, this campaign is merely a symbolic gesture to highlight what happens when you step away from the board, where a fair world is not a reality for many, and the dream of having perfect equality between races and people is still far from coming true.

Share your own move
towards an equal world

Share your own move
towards an equal world

Share your own move
towards an equal world

To raise awareness for equality, Magnus and Anish made their own move by changing a rule in chess. We hope that you’re now inspired to make your own. Either through chess, like Magnus and Anish, or simply by sharing your support with the hashtag #MoveForEquality. Let’s make this world a more equal place for everyone.

To raise awareness for equality, Magnus and Anish made their own move by changing a rule in chess. We hope that you’re now inspired to make your own. Either through chess, like Magnus and Anish, or simply by sharing your support with the hashtag #MoveForEquality. Let’s make this world a more equal place for everyone.